Image taken from Pixabay @ https://pixabay.com/photos/mcdonalds-ronald-joker-heath-ledger-2227657/

The Appeal of the Joker (Part 2 of ?)

Good day, everyone! Here is another Joker throwback to my days at Sourcerer to help carry us through the week. Remember, one bad day can make all the difference!

The Joker, continued

 

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Image taken from Pixabay @ https://pixabay.com/illustrations/gabriel-moral-illustration-art-2519793/

My Thoughts (5-7-19)

This has been a hell of a week, guys. Sometimes it feels like there is an unseen crowd of malcontents out to get us and bring us down, but we keep moving forward. We endure.

We got to go see Avengers: Endgame this weekend, and it was certainly worth the wait. We both loved it. I feel an internal need to begin writing some short posts on here about individual characters from the movie, their arcs, and how they wrapped up. I think that will be rewarding for me and anyone else who really enjoyed the film. I may wait a bit longer to avoid spoiling it for anyone who hasn’t yet seen it, though.

That said, I want to take this opportunity to thank whoever might be reading this. Thank you for coming back to this blog after it being in suspended animation for so long, or thank you for taking a chance on your first visit. I hope that my thoughts strike a chord with you and keep you coming back.

More to come.

 

If you’re a fan of books and hot beverages, check us out at Blue Spider Books. And check out our blog here!

The Appeal of Terry McGinnis as Batman

In keeping with last Sunday’s theme, here is another reblog of one of my old Batman posts from Sourcerer:

via Batman Beyond!

 

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The Appeal of Captain Pike

Captain-Pike-in-Star-Trek-Discovery
Image of the three actors to portray Captain Pike on television taken from Screenrant @ https://screenrant.com/star-trek-discovery-captain-pike-explained/

WARNING: SPOILERS MAY FOLLOW

Last week saw Anson Mount’s Captain Pike exit Star Trek: Discovery, to many a viewer’s chagrin. I have been a tremendous fan of Mount’s portrayal of Pike and will miss his presence in the show. I feel that Discovery has done a wonderful job expanding Pike’s character and has successfully elevated him to the same legendary level of other Star Trek captains.

Indeed, this season’s revelation that Pike was shown his eventual fate, disfigured, unable to move, and trapped in a mechanical chair only able to transmit simple yes-and-no responses, and that he embraced it was perhaps one of the most emotionally satisfying moments of the show thus far. All at once, the character’s sense of right action, of honor, and of the love he feels for those under his command become his defining traits.

I always wondered at the depth of loyalty that Spock felt for his old captain in the Star Trek episode “The Menagerie,” a bond so powerful that he would risk the ire of Captain Kirk and his crew, the end of his Starfleet career, and likely even death for visiting a forbidden planet. But it makes sense now. Spock risked everything for Captain Pike because Captain Pike once did the same for him. Let us also appreciate that Captain Pike was Gene Roddenberry’s first draft of his idealized heroic captain character, making Pike the intellectual ancestor of every other Star Trek captain we have come to love.

(And don’t forget to sign the petition asking CBS to consider a spin-off series about the adventures of Captain Pike and the Enterprise here!)

If you’re a fan of books and hot beverages, check us out at Blue Spider Books. And check out our blog here!

The Appeal of Bruce Wayne as Batman

For the weekends, I want to make throwback posts to my earlier pieces that will fit nicely into the theme of this series. Enjoy!

“Why do we love Bruce Wayne?” at Sourcerer:

https://wp.me/p44GO7-m0

 

If you’re a fan of books and hot beverages, check us out at Blue Spider Books. And check out our blog here!

The Appeal of Dracula

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Poster image taken from IMDB @ https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0103874/mediaviewer/rm178840064

Don’t worry; I’m not going to try to defend the vampire sub-genre here. While some of the older, campier versions of Dracula can be fun, my favorite iteration is the one portrayed by Gary Oldman in the Francis Ford Coppola film from 1992. It also hearkens back to my favorite section of the original Bram Stoker novel, and what, for me, redeems the monster at the center of the entire story.

In the original novel, there is a scene where Dracula and Harker stay up all night just talking, and as dawn breaks Dracula has to run away to hide from the sunlight. I loved this moment. It demonstrates the lonely old immortal Dracula, and that he truly did just yearn for companionship. The novel gets really tedious after this when it swaps to Mina’s letter-writing perspective, but that one small section always gets me.

I feel that the lonely Dracula longing for a human connection (despite, you know, eating Gypsy babies) is the one best embodied in Gary Oldman’s performance. I love this movie, and I can’t recommend it enough if you have never seen it. The cinematography is fantastic, and the central story line that develops of an immortal, heartbroken being chasing a lost love throughout time is one certain to catch the attention of fans of horror, dark fantasy, and paranormal romance all at once.

 

If you’re a fan of books and hot beverages, check us out at Blue Spider Books. And check out our blog here!